5 tips for your next website (re)design + my smokin' hot new website REVEAL!

 
 

Designing your own website is a pain in the booty.

There are oodles of moving parts and techie tactics to maneuver, but beyond the digi-detail drama, we also have to work through the endless possibilities and choices available to us to capture that big sparkly vision.

Pair all of this with the self-induced pressure to create something Beyoncé-level...and we end up feeling totally tapped out.

And while the redesign process CAN make us feel one part Julie Andrews spinning through fields of green...it can also make us feel like a cranky toddler ready to to rage tantrum-style.

I've been bouncing back and forth between both of these status updates over the last few weeks as this day approached...and girlllll...did I learn A LOT.

And the extra special good news?

I took notes along the way, just for YOU.

In celebration of my new website launch over at amberlilyestrom.com, I put together a little short list to help you make that next website design project easy, breezy!

5 Tips for Your Next Website (Re)Design

1. Start by identifying what you don't want. 

I always ask my clients to share a list of links to websites they adore. We then spend time not only identifying what they love about said websites, but we pick apart all of the things they don't like. This is helpful for both of us to identify their TOP priorities and also design a vision that feels unique to them. 

2. PLAY. Dream. Pin. Allow your creative spirit to FLOW. 

This is the extra fun part and, often, my client's favorite part of our process. Grab a glass of wine, curl up on the couch with your laptop and start PINNING. Dig in over on Pinterest and start creating an inspiration board that tells your brand story. Consider pinning things like:

  • Fonts
  • Color swatches/palettes
  • Photos
  • Logos
  • Wardrobe elements
  • Home decor/interior design images

Search terms like "branding board" or "photography" or "headshots" or "handwriting fonts" to find dynamic and fun examples of elements that could inform your brand design, look and feel. 

Remember, you CANNOT DO THIS WRONG. 

3. Speak in your true voice.

There is nothing worse than reading through a website that is written in the robot-speak. Impersonal (third person), sterile, corporate speak is best left for the appliance manuals, not your website. 

So write like you speak. Tell us your story with YOUR words...use examples that relate to your life experience that others will vividly envision (ex. that Julie Andrews-like-feeling of embarking on a wide open new website project).

Make your words RELATABLE, REAL and RAW. 

4. Consider your customer experience throughout your website.

Scroll through each page of your website and ask yourself the following questions: 

  • Does my website copy & imagery position my client as the hero? 
  • Does my website layout and design direct my client to my desired call to action?
  • Does my website clearly communicate how I can provide a solution to my client's problem?
  • How does my website make my client feel? The winning answer here is: INSPIRED. 

5. Invest in epic photography.

Amazing photography (ala Lauren Bodwell Photography) has been a game changer for me in my brand + business. And it's not just because of the gorgeous photos, but also because of the way the process of being photographed for my brand makes me FEEL.

Seeing yourself embodying your brand message, living your version of freedom and doing so in order to show your clients what's possible is exhilarating.  

Stepping up and in to your power, claiming your essence and sharing it with the world in photographic form is pure magic. 

Don't skimp on your brand photography. Keep your images up to date and do them at least once per year, if you can. Having amazing photos makes the design process so.much.easier. 

Can't afford a photographer? Check out stock photography sites like pexels.com or stocksy.com for cool, styled shots. And make sure to read the license agreements before using any images that do not belong to you on your website for copyright guidelines.

BONUS: Friends don't let friends have ugly websites...

If you need help getting started or just flat out don't want to deal with going it alone...we've got you covered. Click here to schedule a free discovery call and we'll get you on your way....because spending our precious time in the valley of self-doubt and confusion land is for the birds!

I hope you will take some time to make yourself comfy in my new digi-space!

And I am über-proud of the work the Brand Love Studio team and I did together to design a space that feels just like me, inside and out (because that's what our websites are supposed to feel like, after all). 

I'd love to hear your thoughts in the comments below, answer your questions and support you on your journey...you deserve a website that rocks your socks off too!


Grab my 5-day Brand YOU Challenge + get crystal clear on your brand (and life) message right here.

 
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About Amber: 

Amber Lilyestrom is a soul-based branding, business & clarity coach, writer and speaker. Amber helps entrepreneurs turn their passions in to heart-centered brands and thriving businesses. From idea conception to the construction of the business and all of its digital assets, she assists new entrepreneurs in changing the world, one beautiful brand at a time. 

Amber has helped hundreds of entrepreneurs launch their businesses and walk away from unfulfilling careers to transform their lives and pursue their passions. 

You can learn more and connect with Amber at www.amberlilyestrom.com

 

 

Amber Lilyestrom

Amber Lilyestrom is a soul-based branding & business coach, writer and motivational speaker. Amber currently coaches new and established entrepreneurs in creating strategies to transform their brands and businesses. She also works with individuals who want to leave their current careers and launch their big idea. From idea conception to the construction of the business and all of its digital assets, Amber assists new entrepreneurs in making “the big leap.”